open data

Stamen Watercolor Map Tiles

Adding Basemaps to QGIS With Web Mapping Services

For this final post of 2020, I was looking back through recent projects for something interesting yet brief; I’ve been writing some encyclopedia-length posts lately and wanted to keep this one on the lighter side. In that vein, I’ve decided to share a short list of free web mapping services that I use as basemaps in QGIS (they’ll work in ArcGIS too). This has been on my mind as I’ve recently stumbled upon the OpenTopoMap, which is an alternate stylized version of the OpenStreetMap that looks pretty sharp.

See this earlier post for details, but in short, to connect to these services in QGIS:

QGIS Browser Panel
  1. Select the appropriate web map service type in the browser panel (usually WMS / WMTS or XYZ Tiles), right click, and add new connection.
  2. Give it a meaningful name, paste the appropriate URL into the URL box, click OK.
  3. In the browser panel drill down to see the service, and for WMS / WMTS layers you can drill down further to see specific layers you can add.
  4. Select the layer and drag it into the window, or select, right click, and add the layer to the project.
  5. If the resolution looks off, right click on a blank area of the toolbar and check the Tile Scale Panel. Use this to adjust the zoom for the web map. If the scale bar is greyed out you’ll need to set the map window to the same CRS as the map service: select the layer in the panel, right click, and choose set CRS – set project CRS from layer.
  6. Some web layers may render slowly if you’re zoomed out to the full extent, or even not at all if they contain many features or are super detailed. Conversely, some layers may not render if you’re zoomed too far in, as tiles may not be available at that resolution. Experiment!

If you’re an ArcGIS user see these concise instructions for adding various tile layers. This isn’t something that I’ve ever done, as ArcGIS already has a number of accessible basemaps that you can add.

In the list below, links for the service name take you to either the website version of the service, or to a list of additional layers that you can connect to. The URLs that follow are the actual connections to the service that you’ll use within your GIS package. If you use OSM, OTP, or Stamen in your maps, make sure to cite them (they use Creative Commons Licenses – follow links to their websites for details). The government sources are public domain, but you should still cite them anyway. Happy mapping, and happy holidays!

OpenStreetMap XYZ Tile (global)

http://tile.openstreetmap.org/{z}/{x}/{y}.png

OpenTopoMap XYZ Tile (global)

https://tile.opentopomap.org/{z}/{x}/{y}.png

Stamen XYZ Tile (global) see their website for examples; the image topping this post is from watercolor

http://tile.stamen.com/terrain/{z}/{x}/{y}.png
http://tile.stamen.com/toner/{z}/{x}/{y}.png
http://tile.stamen.com/watercolor/{z}/{x}/{y}.jpg

USGS National Map WMTS (global, but fine detail is US only)

Imagery:
https://basemap.nationalmap.gov/arcgis/rest/services/USGSImageryOnly/MapServer/WMTS/1.0.0/WMTSCapabilities.xml

Imagery & Topo:
https://basemap.nationalmap.gov/arcgis/rest/services/USGSImageryTopo/MapServer/WMTS/1.0.0/WMTSCapabilities.xml

Shaded Relief: 
https://basemap.nationalmap.gov/arcgis/rest/services/USGSShadedReliefOnly/MapServer/WMTS/1.0.0/WMTSCapabilities.xml

Topographic:
https://basemap.nationalmap.gov/arcgis/rest/services/USGSTopo/MapServer/WMTS/1.0.0/WMTSCapabilities.xml

US Census Bureau TIGERweb WMS (US only) see their website for older vintages

Current TIGER features:
https://tigerweb.geo.census.gov/arcgis/services/TIGERweb/tigerWMS_Current/MapServer/WMSServer 

Current physical features:
https://tigerweb.geo.census.gov/arcgis/services/TIGERweb/tigerWMS_PhysicalFeatures/MapServer/WMSServer

CEC North America LULC

Dataset Roundup: A Summary of Specialized Open Data Sources

I list the top free GIS data sources that I consistently use on my Resources page; these are general, foundational sources that can be used for many applications. In this post I’m going to summarize an eclectic mix of more specialized resources that I’ve used or that have been recommended to me over this past year. I’ve categorized these into GIS datasets, sub-national population data for countries (tabular data that can be joined to GIS vector layers), and historic socio-economic data for countries.

Geospatial Data

North American Land Change Monitoring System

Published by the Commission for Environmental Cooperation, these land use and land cover rasters (see photo at the top of this post) are derived from MODIS imagery at 250 meter resolution for earlier years and either Landsat-7 or RapidEye imagery at 30 meter resolution for later years for Canada, the United States, and Mexico in 2005, 2010, and 2015. There are layers for both land cover and land cover change over a 5-year period. Land cover is classified into 19 categories based on UN FAO standards. It’s easy to download as the layer is unified (no individual tiles to mess with and stitch together) and for the 2015 series you can choose a national file or one for the entire continent.

PRISM Climate Data

Published by the Northwest Alliance for Computational Science & Engineering at Oregon State University, the PRISM Climate Group publishes climate data for the United States. You can generate daily, monthly, or 30-year normal rasters for temperature (min, max, mean), precipitation, dew point, and a few other measures for the continental US. There are also some prepackaged files that were created for special projects that cover Alaska, Hawaii, and some of the US territories. The site is very easy to use (certainly compared to other sites that provide climate data) and beyond its research applications the data is good for teaching purposes, as files are straightforward to create, download, and interpret.

PRISM Mean Temp Map Oct 2020

Marineregions.org Marine Boundaries

I usually help people find vector boundaries for terrestrial features, and the oceans are an afterthought that appear as the absence of land. But what if you specifically needed features that represent oceans and seas? Marineregions.org, maintained by the Flanders Marine Institute, provides many sets of water-based boundaries that include maritime regions (legal sea zones around countries) as well as polygons that represent the boundaries of the oceans and largest seas (IHO Sea Areas, defined by the International Hydrographic Association). See the screenshot of this layer in QGIS below.

IHO Seas Layer in QGIS

GNSS Time Series

Produced by NASA JPL, this dataset can be used for measuring vertical land movement (VLM) and subsistence, primarily due to movement of the earth’s tectonic plates. The dataset contains over 2,000 GPS observation points or stations; the majority are in the US but there are a scattering of points throughout the world. The data file for geodetic positions and velocities contains two records for every station: the POS (position) record provides data for the latitude (N), longitude (E), and elevation (V) in mm. The VEL (velocity) indicates the rate of movement over the time period by direction (N / E) and elevation. The last three columns for both sets of records are margins of error for each value. The data file is in a fixed-width text format. To use it in GIS you need to parse the data into a tabular format and drop the header information. When plotting the coordinates, the CRS for the geodetic file is IGS14 (EPSG code 9019). If your CRS library doesn’t include this system, it is roughly equivalent to ITRF2014 (EPSG code 7789).

Subnational Population Data

IPUMS Terra

Are you looking for population or socio-economic data for the first-level administrative divisions (states, provinces, departments, districts, etc) for many different countries? IPUMS Terra is part of the IPUMS series at the Minnesota Population Center, Univ of Minnesota. The data has been gathered from census and statistical agencies of individual countries, or in some cases from estimates generated by the project. Choose the "Create Your Custom Dataset" option, then on the next screen choose "Start Extract Area Level Output". On the Extract Builder (see pic below) choose variables on the left, like Demographic and Total Population. Then under Datasets on the right you can choose countries and filter by year. Once you move on to the next screen, you can choose to harmonize the output or choose specific years, and choose your administrative level: national, ADM-1, or smallest available. You must register to use the IPUMS data series, but registration is free for educational and non-commercial use (as long as you cite IPUMS as the source).

IPUMS Terra Interface

Subnational Human Development Index

An alternative for first-level admin data is the Subnational Human Development Index published by the GlobalDataLab at the Institute for Management Research at Radboud University. There are far fewer variables and less customization compared to IPUMS Terra, but as such the site is smaller and easier to use. There are several different indices for measuring human development, but you can also access the following indicators: life expectancy, GNI per capita, expected and mean years of schooling, and population size in millions.

Historic Global Population and Economic Data

Maddison Project

Yes, that’s Maddison with two "ds". This project from the Groningen Growth and Development Centre at the University of Groningen generates comparative economic growth, income, and population data for countries over a long historical time span; back to the year AD 1 in a few cases, but for the most part from AD 1500 forward. They provide detailed documentation that explains how the dataset was created, and it’s easy to download in either an Excel or STATA format.

The World Countries Urban Population

This dataset consists of two spreadsheet files – one for the total urban population and another for the urban ratio of the population for countries going back to the year 1500. The dataset was created by Jonathan Fink-Jensen at Utrecht University and is held in the International Institute of Social History’s data repository. The repository contains a variety of other historic socio-economic datasets for many different countries.